Category Archives: Ayurvedic Medicine

An Ayurvedic Recipe to Balance Vata Dosha



Gajar Sabji: Organic Carrot Cashew Curry 

By Chef Suzy Singh

Enjoy this Ayurvedic recipe centered around the Vata Dosha. This Dosha represents pacifying foods that creates a balanced diet. Using NOW Ingredients, we have been able to not only create a balanced diet but also turn this dish into a healthy vegan recipe. Serve warm and enjoy!

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups Organic Carrots, peeled and chopped
  • 1/4 cup Ellyndale Organic Coconut Infusions, Butter Flavor
  • 1/4 cup Ellyndale Nutty Infusion, Cashew Butter
  • 1 Organic Ellyndale Q Cup, Lightly Salted Quinoa
  • 2 Organic Tomatoes, medium dice
  • 2 Organic Onion, medium dice 
  • 1/2 cup Organic Coconut Milk
  • 1 Tbsp NOW Real Food Organic Coconut Sugar 
  • 1 teaspoon salt 
  • 1 teaspoon NOW CurcuFresh, Curcumin Powder 
  • 1 teaspoon coriander powder
  • 1 teaspoon Fenugreek Leaves (Menthi)
  • 1 teaspoon cumin, toasted
  • 2 garlic cloves, grated
  • 2″ ginger, grated and chopped
  • 4 curry leaves 
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 1 bay leaf

Directions:

  1. In a sauce pot on medium heat, add 1 tablespoon organic coconut infusions, butter flavor.  
  2. Add cubed tomatoes and onions, garlic, and ginger. 
  3. Sauté for 7-10 minutes or until onions have softened. 
  4. Pour all ingredient into blender, combine until puree is formed.
  5. Add curry leaves, cinnamon stick, bay leaf, and clove. 
  6. Toast spices for 3-5 minutes or until aromatic spices are released. 
  7. Add tomato mixture, coriander powder, curcufresh, and coconut sugar. 
  8. Reduce for 5-7 minutes. 
  9. Add carrots, cashew butter coconut milk, and fenugreek leaves. 
  10. Reduce for an additional 10 minutes. 
  11. In a sauté pan on high heat, add organic coconut infusions, butter flavor. 
  12. Add cumin and cubed ginger to pan. Sauté for 2-3 minutes or until cumin releases aromatics. 
  13. Place 1/2 cup of hot water with toasted cumin and ginger in Q cup. Cover and cook for 5 minutes. 
  14. Place Q cup at bottom pf

Boost Bliss (& Loosen Your Hips!) with This Restorative Gomukasana

It’s the perfect release following an energetic yoga practice.

Craving change but feeling too stuck, sluggish, or restless to take aim? Join John Douillard, founder of LifeSpa.com, and Larissa Hall Carlson, Ayurveda Yoga Specialist, for Ayurveda 201: Six Weeks to Transformation and Bliss Through Ayurvedic Psychology. In this new online course, you’ll experience: unique yoga practices; inspiring discussions backed by science; and recipes, herbs, and a short, gentle cleanse. Sign up today!

After an energizing yoga flow, there’s one restorative pose that can help you boost harmony and bliss. (In Ayurveda, this easeful quality is called sattva.) This supported, supine variation of Gomukasana (Cow Face Pose) provides deep rest by elevating the legs and loosening tight hips. This soothing inertia rejuvenates!

See also 6 Bonus Sattva-Boosting Tips

You’ll need the following props: 2 blocks, 1 bolster, 1 blanket, and an eye pillow

Instructions

  • Place a block in the highest position about 6 inches from the bottom of your mat. From there place another block in the second-highest position about 6 inches up the mat.
  • Drape a bolster over the blocks to make a ramp for your legs.
  • Place folded blanket (and any additional supportive props you need) on the top half of the mat. 
  • Lay yourself down on the blanket with your knees pulled into your chest, placing your buttocks close to the bottom of the bolster ramp. 
  • Mindfully lengthen your left leg, crossing it to the right and placing your thigh on the bolster. Cross your right leg over y left thigh. 
  • Even out the weight in your hips and let both feet hang. 
  • Comfortably position your eye pillow, then broaden your shoulders and rest your hands on your belly. 
  • Hold for 1-3 minutes. Then reverse your leg crossing for another 1-3 minutes. 
  • Rest and renew!

See also:

How to Snap Out of Autopilot and Overcome Mindless Habits Through Ayurvedic Psychology

Find bliss through ayurvedic psychology (not two-day shipping or instagram likes.)

Larissa Hall Carlson

Ancient sages understood that the true path to bliss is the journey inward. That way, established in who you are, you can take aim at your duties and desires from an embodied space of pure intentions. Connected to this place, you are secure, purposeful, and joyful. From the significant stuff, like starting a new relationship, to seemingly frivolous acts like ordering another pair of sneakers, you are conscious of, and clear on, what you add to your proverbial (and literal) cart—and why.

However, because of trauma, injury, or day-to-day stress, it’s all too easy to detach from this center. In Ayurveda, the 5,000-year-old sister science of yoga, the word for feeling separate—from one’s self, from others, from the universe’s unlimited source of love—is called prajnaparadha, or “mistake of the intellect,” which is also deemed a root cause of disease. We often lose touch with our inner worlds, where we find true contentment, says John Douillard, Ayurvedic expert and founder of LifeSpa, a Boulder-based wellness clinic and online shop. We trade in our bliss for superficial pursuits instead.

As a result, we compensate by lacing the body and mind with ego—so physique, wit, or career end up defining us; material consumption (two-day shipping) and instant gratification (Instagram story views) are the only activities that spark a pulse of feeling at all.

See also How to Avoid Social Media Blues

“The pendulum in our lifetime has swung in the direction of reward chemistry and being satisfied in a temporary way by some type of sensory stimulation,” says Douillard. “Of course, what goes up must come down. Overstimulation leads to a crash, which results in a deep state of exhaustion and discontent. Then your brain chemistry craves …

YJ Tried It: I Followed an Ayurvedic, Dosha-Balancing Diet for a Week


Yoga Journal video contributor Sky Cowans tries following an Ayurvedic nutrition plan based on her dosha (mind-body type).

Yoga Journal video contributor Sky Cowans tries following an Ayurvedic nutrition plan based on her dosha (mind-body type).

Ayurveda is the world’s oldest health system and the sister science of yoga. Ayurveda is based on the elements in nature. According to Ayurveda, there are three mind-body types called the doshas. Vatta, Pitta, and Kapha. Vatta is air, Pitta is fire and Kapha is the earth. Based on your mind-body type, Ayurveda offers various nutrition, self-care, and spiritual recommendations to bring the mind, body, and spirit back into balance and harmony.

In this video, Sky interviews Sahara Rose, an Ayurvedic expert and nutritionist. Sahara discusses Sky’s Pitta imbalance and advises her how to structure a meal plan to bring her body back to balance.

See also 7 Chakra-balancing Ayurvedic Soup Recipes

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